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2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 24: National, State and Local Flowers – Guest Challenge

Flowers are those little colorful beacons of the sun from which we get sunshine when dark, somber skies blanket our thoughts. ~Dodinsky

Mindy Erickson has a great Guest Challenge for us this Week, photographing your National, State or Local flower or Flower Emblem. Almost every region in the world uses flowers as a colorful, full of life symbol of representation.

 

edited hibscus

Hibiscus, national flower of Haiti, South Korea, Malaysia… – by Mindy Erickson

Hibiscus: a genus of flowering plants in the mallow family, Malvaceae. It is quite large, containing several hundred species that are native to warm-temperate, subtropical and tropical regions throughout the world. Member species are often noted for their showy flowers and are commonly known simply as hibiscus, or less widely known as rose mallow. The hibiscus flower is traditionally worn by Tahitian and Hawaiian girls. If the flower is worn behind the left ear, the woman is married or in a relationship. If the flower is worn on the right, she is single or openly available for a relationship. The hibiscus is Hawaii’s state flower.

hawaiianink ginger

National Flower of Samoa – by Mindy Erickson

Hawaiian pink ginger:  known in Hawaiian as ‘Awapuhi Ula’Ula.  I am a cylinder shaped flower pastel pink in color. If growing conditions are right, I will reach a height of 15 feet, and I will flower all year round. If my floral head is allowed to mature, plantlets will eventually appear. In this way, I propagate myself. I was introduced to Hawai‘i as an ornamental before 1930, and I am naturalized here in valleys and on the windward sides of  islands. I grows well in rich soil and in wet habitats, but I can grow in dry areas as well. Pink ginger is quite popular as an ornamental and cut flower, both for the home and for commercial sale. When we refer to “red  ginger” in this publication, this usually includes both red and pink gingers.

Johnny Jump Up

Viola tricolor – by Mindy Erickson

Viola tricolor:  Also known as Johnny Jump up (though this name is also applied to similar species such as the yellow pansy), heartsease, heart’s ease, heart’s delight, tickle-my-fancy, Jack-jump-up-and-kiss-me, come-and-cuddle-me, three faces in a hood, or love-in-idleness, is a common European wild flower, growing as an annual or short-lived perennial. It has been introduced into North America, where it has spread. It is the progenitor of the cultivated pansy, and is therefore sometimes called wild pansy; before the cultivated pansies were developed, “pansy” was an alternative name for the wild form.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Backlit Tulips / Tulipes à contre-jours

The Tulip is the National Flower of Afghanistan and Iran

Tulips: The tulip is a Eurasian and North African genus of perennial, bulbous plants in the lily family. It is a herbaceous herb with showy flowers, of which around 75 wild species are currently accepted. The genus’s native range extends west to the Iberian Peninsula, through North Africa to Greece, the Balkans, Turkey, throughout the Levant and Iran, north to Ukraine, southern Siberia and Mongolia, and east to the Northwest of China. The tulip’s centre of diversity is in the Pamir, Hindu Kush, and Tien Shan mountains. It is a common element of steppe and winter-rain Mediterranean vegetation

California Poppy, Eschscholzia californica

The California Poppy is California’s State Flower

California poppy: A poppy is a flowering plant in the subfamily Papaveroideae of the family Papaveraceae. Poppies are herbaceous plants, often grown for their colorful flowers. One species of poppy, Papaver somniferum, is the source of the crude drug opium which contains powerful medicinal alkaloids such as morphine and has been used since ancient times as an analgesic and narcotic medicinal and recreational drugs. It also produces edible seeds. Following the trench warfare which took place in the poppy fields of Flanders, during the 1st World War, poppies have become a symbol of remembrance of soldiers who have died during wartime.

Waratah

Waratah: New South Wales official floral emblem

Waratah flower: Waratah is an Australian-endemic genus of five species of large shrubs or small trees, native to the southeastern parts of Australia. The most well-known species in this genus is Telopea speciosissima, which has bright red flowers and is the NSW state emblem. The waratah is a member of the plant family Proteaceae, a family of flowering plants distributed in the Southern Hemisphere. The key diagnostic feature of Proteaceae is the inflorescence, which is often very large, brightly coloured and showy, consisting of many small flowers densely packed into a compact head or spike. Species of waratah boast such inflorescences ranging from 6–15 cm in diameter with a basal ring of coloured bracts. The leaves are spirally arranged, 10–20 cm long and 2–3 cm broad with entire or serrated margins. The name waratah comes from the Eora Aboriginal people, the original inhabitants of the Sydney area

To complete your Challenge you will need to:
  • Photograph one symbolic flower (Hopefully with local signification to you, Country, State, Municipal or geographical) and document the name and region it is from.
  •  Preferably photographed in it’s natural habitat but for folks in the Southern Hemisphere we’ll make an understandable exception.
Be creative when you photograph and edit your flowers. (Here’s a quick video to help)
The tools you may need to complete your challenge:
  • Diffuser: You can use a purpose built diffuser or use a piece of translucent cloth to soften the light
  • Reflector: Reflector can help open up shadows in certain situations. You can even use a white piece of paper or plastic card
  • Polarizing Filter: Will help enhance color contrasts and gain richer colors by reducing some glare
  • Cross Polarization: If you participated in the Cross-Polarization challenge, here’s a great opportunity to put in practice those skills
  • Portable Flash: A second source of light may also be used, especially for fill lighting. Always best to diffuse the light from the flash. You may also use it to freeze motion on a windy day.
  • A tripod: I always use tripods to photograph still subjects. It allows me to experiment without loosing my original composition
  • A stick in the ground can be used to secure the stem is it tends to be moving in the wind. (Don’t break plants or flowers for a photo)

 

For your personal safety please become familiar with bugs, insects, arachnids plants (Poison Oak, Poison Ivy, Giant Hogweed…) and wildlife in your area that can harm you before venturing out on a nature hike. Use appropriate repellents when necessary, especially for ticks and mosquito in infected areas.

Always respect nature and leave bird nests and young animals alone. Even if they appear to be in distress, they really may not be. Always better to call wildlife authorities (Fish and Wildlife) in your area before interfering with nature.

 

My name is Mindy Erickson and I live in sunny Southern California.  I started taking pictures 21 years ago when my little guys were born.   Since then, I have moved up from 35mm to digital and haven’t stopped.  I joined this group to get ideas from other non pro’s like me and to expand my knowledge of photography.  I have found that there is a difference in taking pictures and making memories.  I hope to do both!

 

  • The rules are pretty simple:
  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.

Imogen, by Barbara Asboth

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 23: SINGLE SOURCE…

If you don’t actually read this post in full, you will submit an incorrect image. What I’m asking is a number of things.

This week’s portrait must be made of a NEW subject. It also requires a single source of light, the sun. And it must be backlit. So, you’ll tap into your work last week, looking for something backlit by the sun. But you’ll also need to look back to the week of portraits where I asked you to bounce light, to light up your subject. What follows will be a few examples

Backlit Jess

Sarah

You may find that getting some help holding your bounce, to direct the light just right, will help. Or a separate tripod or music stand with a clamp, could position it just right.

In the evening

Stunning Shauna
The rules are pretty simple:

  • Create your portrait of someone you haven’t captured for any of the other challenges.
  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 22: BACKLIT – TRANSLUCENT NATURE

We’ve had some feedback from members in Australia regarding posting times. I’m posting earlier and would appreciate feedback so that we can better plan in order to accomodate our members in  every part of the world. Please leave a comment or use the CONTACT US form. Although this challenge is available earlier, please only post starting 00:01 Sunday PST. THANKS.

 

Backlighting (Contre-jour) in photography is often used to create silhouettes. This week we’ll focus on a different approach to backlit subjects, we’re looking for translucency in nature subjects. Nature is full of unique textures and colors that can only be perceived and photographed as light passes through your subject when lit from behind.

 

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Translucent Feathers II - Ring Billed Gull

I myself particularly like the effect on birds, more specifically large white birds such as Gulls, Snow Geese and Egrets… This particular image of a Ring-billed Gull has great contrast between the translucent feathers and the dark silhouetted non-translucent body of the bird.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Backlit Tulips / Tulipes à contre-jours

Translucency in nature isn’t only limited to the feathers of birds. Leaves and petals come in all sizes, shapes and colors as illustrated by these tulips.

 

This backlit Black-capped Chickadee feeding on frozen sap is an other great example of what we can bring to life under a different light.

 

Ledge

The possibilities are absolutely endless, even a large wave in the right conditions will come to life under backlit conditions.

Steve Troletti Photography: Litter in Montreal Nature Parks / déchets dans les parcs nature de Montréal &emdash; Litter - Tim Hortons Coffee Cup / Déchets - Tasse de café Tim Hortons

You may not always like what you find, keep an open mind and maximize your possibilities. This cup was found along a river in a nature park. Converted into drug paraphernalia, it’s just one more example of what people leave behind in or natural heritage.

  • To complete your challenge you will need to find a subject, preferably outdoor that permits light to pass through without being completely transparent.
  • At times you may need to use a bit of fill flash to bring more out of your subject. I suggest you experiment with and without for the best results.
  • NEVER point your camera directly into the sun, especially mid-day sun. Make sure there’s an object between you and the Sun to prevent damage to your camera.
  • NEVER look at the Sun through a DSLR. Even with filters that appear to diminish light (I.E. IR Filters) you can still cause damage to your eyes and metering sensors.

For your personal safety please become familiar with bugs, insects, arachnids plants (Poison Oak, Poison Ivy, Giant Hogweed…) and wildlife in your area that can harm you before venturing out on a nature hike. Use appropriate repellents when necessary, especially for ticks and mosquito in infected areas.

Always respect nature and leave bird nests and young animals alone. Even if they appear to be in distress, they really may not be. Always better to call wildlife authorities (Fish and Wildlife) in your area before interfering with nature.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 21: B&W – Automobiles

For some people cars are simply a machine that gets you from place to place. For others, automobiles are a personal statement that reflect individual personalities – some prefer sports cars while others gravitate towards large 4×4 trucks. I’ve always tended toward a more utilitarian approach for my personal cars, choosing function over form, except for the 1965 Mustang I had in my youth.

For the photographer automobiles present the perfect mix of form and function. Auto designers try to achieve beauty while engineers may seek to improve gas mileage or horsepower. What ends up on the showroom floor blends multiple competing goals into a single product. The challenge this week is to capture the essence of any automobile using black and white photography.
Curves and Chrome
Car designers use many of the same principles of design for autos that we use in photography – strong leading lines, graceful C and S curves, and symmetry. Classic cars especially make use of sweeping lines.
securit-esg
You can choose to capture the entire auto, or just part of it. How you frame the shot is up to you, just pay attention to composition and framing.
Big, mean Mustang

You can also try to tell a story or convey some emotion. The challenge is “automobiles” so trucks, vans, buses, or just about any motorized vehicle will work for this challenge.
Something picks me up

But You Ain't Seen Nothing 'Til Your Baby Drives a Buick, Plate 3

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 20 : GUEST POST – DOORS

This week’s challenge will be photographing Doors. This may seem easy enough you may think… however, there are many concepts to keep in mind. It can be any type of door, so let your creativity flow! The following photos are those that I have taken in my hometown, the City of Detroit. A.k.a. The Motor City, The D, Hitsville USA, HockeyTown…The Renaissance City!

Red Door- Church of the Messiah in Detroit

Red Door- Church of the Messiah in Detroit

My eye was especially drawn to the contrast in colors, as well as the textured bricks here.

Bankers Trust Company Building, Detroit Financial District

Bankers Trust Company Building, Detroit Financial District

This elaborately decorated metal door showing some decay and rusting flanked by marble columns.

Doors. The Heidelberg Project, Detroit

Doors. The Heidelberg Project, Detroit

Art and community has merged in Detroit. Please visit the website to see what else the artist Mr. Tyree Guyton has created on these city blocks. #heidelbergproject #detroitthebeautiful #visitdetroit http://www.heidelberg.org/

B&W of The Church of the Messiah, Detroit

B&W of The Church of the Messiah, Detroit

Black and white photos bring a whole different essence to the eye. IMO

HDR of Christ Church Detroit Creatives create. Be creative.

HDR of Christ Church Detroit
Creatives create. Be creative.

Don’t forget the basics: lighting/shadows, composition, cropping, balance and symmetry, perspective, negative space, patterns, repetition, etc., etc,.

You may find it necessary to use a tripod as well.

 

About Me (Yvonne Taylor):

I born,raised and LIVING in Detroit, MI. #forlife #forlove. I’m married with teenaged boy. I’m a sous chef in my mind.  I’m currently shooting with an Nikon D610. The above images were shot using the Tamron 70-200 2.8. I enjoy all forms of photography.  #photographyislife.

You can see what I see by following my Google+ page:  Beauty in Detroit

https://plus.google.com/u/1/communities/112432728438926491353

Or on Instagram @evemoniquephotography

 

Special thanks to the moderators of Photochallenge.org for allowing me to do this guest challenge. I hope you all enjoy it. Happy shooting!

 

“There are things known and things unknown and in between are the DOORS.” – Jim Morrison

 

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 19 : PORTRAIT OF A MOTHER

Happy Mother’s Day to all the Moms. Most of us are celebrating Mother’s Day today and here at the 2016 PhotoChallenge, we’re celebrating MOMS all week long by honoring them with our very own portrait.
Mom snuggling

The B&W portrait of Mom and her newborn is a classic that holds true to the bond between mother and child. Usually performed in the privacy of a studio in controlled lighting conditions.

 

Mother's Day!

As we grow older, captured moments with our mom will one day become priceless memories. Outdoor images come to life and look more natural. Remember not to have your subjects directly looking into the sunlight. It’s often best to use a reflector or a little burst of fill flash to open up shadows in harsher lighting.

Mugsy

For this special assignment you may just want to focus on mom without any distractions… It can be your own mother or any other Special Mom you want to honor.

My beautiful Mama

I myself always prefer B&W Portraits but it’s up to you to choose that special look for the final image you submit to the 2016 PhotoChallenge.

Didn't get to see my own mom this mother's day but I did get to spend the morning with this lovely, beautiful one. My mommy is my best friend and the most selfless person I've ever come across, I don't know what kind of person I would be without her love

A selfie with Mom is just as good 🙂

Basic guidelines for portraits are 50mm to 85mm on a crop body and 85mm to 105mm on a full frame. Those are just guidelines, you should freely experiment as we’ve even had great looking portraits with a fisheye. Usually wider lenses distort facial features while longer lenses tend to flatten features.

You may choose to use controlled lighting in a studio-like environment. If you go outdoors you may want to bring a reflector or flash to open up shadows. I tend to prefer natural light balanced with a reflector.

Pay attention to distracting items in the background. Keeping a distance between mom and objects in the background will minimize shadows from flash and make it easier to isolate your subject.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.
unnamed

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 18: BUDS + WEEKLY BONUS CHALLENGE

BUDS – “In botany, a bud is an undeveloped or embryonic shoot and normally occurs in the axil of a leaf or at the tip of a stem. Once formed, a bud may remain for some time in a dormant condition, or it may form a shoot immediately. Buds may be specialized to develop flowers or short shoots, or may have the potential for general shoot development” – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bud

Steve Troletti Photography: Flowers, Plants and Trees /Fleurs, plantes et arbres &emdash; Blooming Magnolia

This week we’re looking for buds, not flowers in full bloom as described by Wikipedia. A great example would be this Magnolia flower bud beginning to bloom.

Steve Troletti Photography: Flowers, Plants and Trees /Fleurs, plantes et arbres &emdash; Allium fistulosum - Welsh onion about to flower

Vegetable plants flower as well as in this Welsh onion about to flower.

 

Sans titre

The same goes for these Ladies Lace flower buds just about to bloom.

Although we associate buds to Spring, that’s not always the case. Many plants can flower throughout the year and the Welsh Onion for example is an early Fall crop.

It’s a simple Challenge and the emphases is on image quality. The composition, choice of lens and lighting is entirely up to you. Reflectors and diffusers are often great tools when going out on a quest to photograph vegetation.

Close-up and Macro will probably be the type of photography employed to complete this challenge and a tripod can help you take the time to properly compose and photograph your subject.

B&W or COLOR

The choice is yours. Nature can be appreciated in B&W as it takes on a totally different persona…

WEEKLY BONUS CHALLENGE

For those interested, I invite you to remember the location of your BUD and follow it’s weekly development posting an update once a week in the comment section of the current challenge. You would be in essence cataloging your subject throughout the remainder of its life-cycle.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.

 

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 17: B&W – STEADFAST

This black and white challenge is one word: STEADFAST

stead·fast, adjective: resolutely or dutifully firm and unwavering.

It’s a simple definition, but leaves the challenge open to wide interpretation. No matter what genre of photography you prefer, you should be able to find something to represent the concept of steadfast, just it shoot in a black and white. While subject is a concept and may be difficult to represent, don’t forget about the technical aspects of your shot: framing, lighting, composition, and exposure. Your composition should speak to the concept just as much as the subject does.  The shoot and the subject should convey the concept together.

It took me a while to find some examples, not because there was a lack of subjects, but because I wanted to find photos that used composition to represent the concept. For me, each of these examples visually represents the word STEADFAST, and each for different reasons.
110825-F-JP934-063

Neither Nor

Statue of Liberty

Barry Buddon lights - Christmas Eve

Untitled

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE WEEK 16: Domestic Bird Portrait – GUEST POST

Finches photographed in a ‘studio’ cage.

Finches photographed in a ‘studio’ cage.

Domestic birds come in many shapes and forms; barnyard chickens, pet finches, ducks, parrots, peacocks and even domestic pigeons. You should be able to find one somewhere, be it caged birds at the pet store or birds at a zoo or exhibition, or maybe you have domestic birds of your own like chickens or a canary.

These shots should be portrait type shots. We aren’t looking for big flocks or birds from a great distance. Aim for a flattering posed shot of one bird. Small groups can make nice portraits too.

Try using treats to get the bird to pose where you want.

Try using treats to get the bird to pose where you want.

First lets look at small birds. Birds in a cage can be shot through an open cage door, if you feel safe doing so, or through the wire. You can make the wire essentially disappear if you get close enough, put the camera right up to the wire and shoot between the bars (rest your lens against the wire). The shallow depth of field from a wide aperture may even blur the wire into non-existence from a little further away. This technique also works on larger cages at the zoo or exhibition.

I shoot between the bars at local exhibitions to get better photos of the chickens. This is a Brown Red Modern Game Bantam rooster.

Brown Red Modern Game Bantam rooster

Brown Red Modern Game Bantam rooster

The problem with getting up and personal with the wire is that you can scare the birds. So go very slow and be patient. Perhaps setup a tripod and let the bird settle down and get used to the camera by its cage. Make sure you aim at a perch that the bird favors. Some birds are curious enough to come down and inspect the camera, make sure you are ready to shoot when that happens.

From further back the cage bars are blurred and Zuko (our light backed Zebra Finch) peers at the camera.

ZukoBarss
With the camera touching the cage I can capture Zuko without bars, although one is visible in the very bottom of this shot.

Zukos

If you shoot through an open door, try to be close enough to discourage the bird from coming out through the door. I find this the best way to shoot my birds because it is easier to get a cleaner shot. Also, you can back off from the cage a little more which is less scary for the bird.

Our canary, Gryphon, came right up and posed for pictures when I opened the door and backed off some. The focus is a bit off because the camera focused on the teacup rather than the twitchy bird.

GryphonWithTeacups

Pay attention to the background! Often cages are busy and messy. Putting a backdrop in the cage is usually not a good option, but you can compromise by putting a backdrop (like a plain sheet) on the outside of the cage to block the view of the room or bright windows. If you are really ambitious you can remove distracting toys and feeders temporarily for the photo shoot.

African Grey Parrot, full body

Larger birds that you take out of the cage can be easier, pose them on a perch or someone’s hand. Pick something un-cluttered for a background or setup a backdrop. Use natural diffused light if you can.

Hen and chicks

Chickens and other barnyard birds can make great domestic bird portraits. Remember to get down at their level for optimal results and again pay attention to the background. You don’t want ugly feed bags or a brightly colored water dish in your shot if you can help it. Food or treats can encourage chickens to pose where you want them, find a good spot to shoot and throw a handful of black sunflower seeds for them.

Our local zoo has peacocks wandering around, they make great photo subjects.

Peacocks

Be patient and take lots of photos! Birds move around a lot, so you need to take lots of shots to get a good one. A higher shutter speed can help freeze the motion as well.

If you absolutely can’t find a good domestic bird to shoot, try to get a nice portrait of a wild bird instead.

A little more about the finch photo at the top: http://buyousef.net/2010/03/04/the-zebra-finches/#more-2286 I would love to get photos like this of my birds, maybe some day I will setup a special cage and try it.

Challenge by Sarah Foote: I’m an amateur photographer from Nova Scotia, Canada, who loves taking pictures everywhere I go, be it camping, wilderness walks, family gatherings or just shots around home.  https://www.facebook.com/teafinchphotos/

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.
Environmental portrait

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE, WEEK 15: PORTRAITS – ENVIRONMENTAL PORTRAITS

First off, let’s clarify that this is not a climate change, activism, or save the environment type of challenge. I’m not passing judgement on those issues, it’s just that historically “environmental portraits” are portraits made of people in their normal environment, and for this challenge I’m challenging you to photograph people in their work environment.

Erica - stranger 23/100

This one will challenge you to get out and probably ask to take someone’s portrait whom you don’t know or only know casually.
Some things to consider is your purpose. The goal is a nice portrait of one person. So be prepared to take your shot, before you ask. Have your settings set. If you’re going to document a waiter, take a couple incognito shots of another waiter at another table.

Waiter

Confirm by chimping, that you’re able to catch enough light and the depth of field you desire. Then, in this example, don’t make the photo from your seat! Ask your waiter/waitress from the table, but stand up to make the photograph.

Farmer Portrait

For this challenge, you’ll be depending on available light. Off camera light will lengthen your “setup time” and that just makes the whole process more cumbersome, and uncomfortable for your subject and probably for you too.

Cop

So consider how dark the location’s existing light may effect the exposure. The solution may just be increasing your ISO, or scouting an overhead brighter light that you could stage your subject underneath. But watch for the dark shadows a light from directly above could create.

Tractor

The sample images should give you some ideas about what kinds of workers you could consider. But also scan through your own group of friends, and maybe select one who works somewhere special or unique. Heck, you may be able to get a nice portrait for your friend that they could use professionally. Who knows, if it turns out nice, their employer may consider hiring you to make similar portraits of all their employees!

Another day, another row to hoe
The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.
  • Extra Rule for the Portrait Challenges, you must shoot a new subject for each portrait.

[Header Image Credit: Environmental portrait, by craig taylor]