2015 Challenge, Week 34: NUMBERS – ODD GROUPS

This week we’re revisiting a challenge from last year – shooting groups with an odd number of objects (or people). Many photographers and designers use the Rule of Thirds to compose images. The Rule of Odds follows a similar principle. Essentially people find groups with odd numbers more appealing.  Your challenge this week is to compose and shoot an odd grouping.

“Group Shot” by Jayel Aheram

The Rule of Odds is used extensively in design and architecture. You can read more about it here:

“Infiltration: Jawa In Disguise” by JD Hancock

The challenge doesn’t have to include numbers. This challenge isn’t about finding something to shoot, it’s about composing a shoot. That means you can set it up however you want, and use anything you want. Just make sure it’s an odd group.

“Orange” by Anne LANDOIS-FAVRET

Since architecture and design often use the Rule of Odds, you can take advantage of what others have already grouped together, like the chairs above.

“Pool Table, plate 1” by AlwaysBreaking

One last thing, this will be the last Numbers challenge for the year. The feedback from the PhotoChallenge.org community made it clear that the numbers challenges became more about finding a number than composing good shots. The point of PhotoChallenge.org is to challenge you to become better a photographer, not go on scavenger hunts for subjects. Also, we want people to have fun and look forward to challenges. My challenges for the rest of the year will be random, and some people will find them extremely difficult and well outside of their comfort zone. Gear won’t matter. You’ll be able shoot with camera phone if you want to.

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+, Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

 

2015 Challenge, Week 33: MACRO – CARBONATION

Are you ready for a new macro challenge? Ready for your creativity to bubble up? This week we will be doing macros of carbonation!

“with a twist of orange” by Jonathan Cohen

This challenge can be done with any kind of fizzy beverage. Try different kinds of beverages and see how the bubbles differ and how the colors make a difference in the final image.

“Bubbly 1” by scyrene

You can try different kinds of glasses and different things floating in the liquid for more variety. Try lighting the glass from above, from below, and from the side. This is a great chance to do something abstract and strange!

“The Hardly Visible Distance” by Andrew Smith

You can try all kinds of creative things for this challenge. If you need some inspiration, try searching Flickr…. you never know what will bubble up to the top of the search results.

“Come to a Head” by Adam Meek

 

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.
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2015 CHALLENGE, WEEK 32 ARCHITECTURE – SYMMETRY

Welcome back to another week of architectural photography. I want to highlight that when I first created this community, I was set on helping photographers of all skills and abilities in growing towards whatever they considered “the next level”. I had made friends with a number of photographers, primarily through photowalking and old photo sharing site called Zooomr. Some ended up being local (read: SoCal), and the rest were scattered around the US and even a few in other countries. Photowalking gave me the greatest opportunity to interact with different leveled photogs. As I reached out to learn something new from photogs I considered better than me, or at least more advanced, I learned how we all share our skills. As I grew, others started asking me for advice. And a concept began to form inside me.

A Mausoleum made for Royalty

Now, over time I began to realize that we also learn from those with less experience, lower priced gear, and even less artistic conceptions. This was when I think I became a real photographer, when I realized that my photographs, my art, wasn’t just me pressing the shutter button. Nor was it the 2D image I had conceived. It was truly the result of all who’d helped me grow, applying what they’d taught me. I was standing on their shoulders, creating art that they too contributed in creating.

NTT Data Fushimi Bldg, Fushimi, Nagoya

These challenges are sometimes difficult. Sometimes you know what you’re going to do, as you’re reading the theme’s post. For those of you looking for a severe challenge each week, I’d better not see you posting a lazy shot on Sunday afternoon. If you want to be challenged, THEN CHALLENGE YOURSELF to create a piece of art that meets the challenge’s theme, AND pushed you to your limits. Then hit one of the group pages and encourage all those other photographers shooting with limited skills, or equipment.

Intersection

OK, on with the theme. Symmetry. I’d like to see a simple and clean shot of the exterior of a unique building. Please hear that last part, a unique building. I’m a sucker for entropy, so anything old and falling apart works. But there are other buildings too. Maybe even tell us your story about why this building is unique to you.

Behind closed doors...

A secondary part to this challenge is more about the processing part. The truth is that most of us will line up our shot, probably on a tripod, and shoot away. And without realizing it, our shot will be a little distorted. Several of my example photos are great examples. To challenge yourself further, bring your image into a photo processing app and simply repair the distortion. The article below explains what I’m talking about best:

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“807/809”, by Trevor Carpenter

That article will also walk you through fixing the distortion, or perspective, in Photoshop as the title says. I know there are plenty of us who can’t use Photoshop, or choose not to. I’m one of you. I use Pixelmator, a much cheaper app for the Mac. Others of you use GIMP. If you’re using something else, I can’t directly help you. Consider GIMP, if purchase price is a concern. GIMP is free, and quite good. I used it on an off for a few years. Here’s a tutorial for fixing the distorted perspective with GIMP. Side note, for those of you shooting these challenges with your iOS devices, there’s an app for that! It actually fixes perspective distortion.

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“Where much is done…”, by Trevor Carpenter

In Pixelmator, and almost all other photo apps, select your image with the Rectangular Marquee Tool (M). Switch to the Move Tool (V). Next you right click on the selection and choose “Transform”. Right click again and choose “Perspective”. In other apps, you may have to choose Distort, and do it one side at a time. The last step is grabbing one of the top corners and pulling it wider, until your image’s perspective is repaired. If the building is on the taller side, you may need to stretch the whole thing taller, to fix it a bit.

One tip I’d like to point out, make sure that you give yourself enough width, surrounding your subject. Ultimately you’ll be stretching your image, and you’ll want some excess to crop out.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

FEATURED IMAGE: The Wrath of the Norse Gods, by Trey Ratcliff

pesto-cross-polarized

2015 CHALLENGE, WEEK 31 OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY – CROSS POLARIZATION MACRO

THE ORIGINAL WEEK 31 CHALLENGE IS STILL AVAILABLE AT THE BOTTOM OF THIS POST

The members have spoken, they want GOOD OLD FASHION TECHNICAL CHALLENGES! Well here it is, never before seen on the PhotoChallenge : CROSS POLARIZATION MACRO Photography.

I’m talking about lighting up your subject with polarized light and filtering that light with an other polarized filter on the lens. It’s an old technique used to reproduce paintings and various artwork as you can eliminate 100% of all light reflections.

Steve Troletti Photography: blog-images &emdash; Pesto Barred Parrot Cross Polarized Portrait

I first attempted to bring this concept down to macro photography last year. I used my in-house wildlife model, PESTO. With Pesto’s help I was able to fine tune my setup and produce some great images in the field. You can read my article on cross polarization here on my blog : http://www.trolettiphoto.com/blog/2014/9/Pesto-the-Barred-parakeet-and-Cross-Polarization

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Black Swallowtail Butterfly Caterpillar

It looked good on Pesto’s feathers. Barely a reflection in his eye. It was but the beginning. Over the winter I tuned my flashes with 3rd party diffusers and attached the Rosco polarizing Gels to them with the use of velcro dots. I now have cleaner softer light that is easier to control in the field. The above image of a Black Swallowtail Butterfly Caterpillar is testimony to my new setup.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Sawfly Larvae - Not Identified
The exact same setup was used on this caterpillar looking Sawfly Larvae. In this case the black background is not only due to a lack of illumination, it’s a silver reflector bouncing the light directly back at the lens. The cross polarized light reflects back as black light, if your setup is well tuned. I also cover my subject with a second reflector as to eliminate reflections from sunlight.

Steve Troletti Photography: blog-images &emdash; Polarized Gels mounted to Vello diffusers

I’m using a fairly humble setup. A Nikon D810 mounted to a Nikkor Micro 105mm lens. I sometimes use a 1.4x teleconverter or/and extension tubes depending on the size of the subject and the working distance I need. I mount all these components to a Manfrotto telephoto support mounted in turn to a macro rail. This allows me to move the camera front or back without moving the tripod. My lighting source is the Nikon R1 close-up Speedlight flash system. There you can see the Vello diffusers and the Rosco Polarizing filter gels. I use a Hoya Pro Digital Circular polarizing filter mounted in front of the lens.

WHAT YOU WILL NEED:

1. Some type of Macro Lens

2. A Circular Polarized Filter for your Lens

3. 1 or more external flash, preferable. (You can also use a built in flash)

4. A linear or polarized filter for your flash I.E. Rosco Polarized Filter Gels (A lens filter or even a good pair of polarized sunglasses will work.)

5. A reflector / diffuser to block light from external sources such as sunlight.

6. A Tripod will make life much easier

The trick is to turn the polarized filter on your lens until the polarized filter in front of your flash turns completely black. I do this in front of a mirror. You can also use a small flashlight behind the flash polarizing filter to make sure you get it just right. It’s important to mark and remember the orientation of your flash polarizing filter and the lens polarizing filter. They have to remain aligned this way or you will not get the desired results.

YOUR CHALLENGE:

PRODUCE A MACRO IMAGE OUTDOORS USING THE PRINCIPLES OF CROSS POLARIZATION. Your subject does not need to be a bug it can be anything outdoor in nature. (NO MAN MADE OBJECTS) Flowers show spectacular colors when using CROSS POLARIZATION. (Ornamental flowers accepted as long as they are outdoor)

EXTERNAL LINKS:

http://www.gyes.eu/photo/cross_polarization.htm

http://www.discoverdigitalphotography.com/2011/cross-polarization-photography/

http://www.diyphotography.net/getting-started-with-cross-polarized-light/

 

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FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO FOLLOW THE ORIGINAL CHALLENGE HONORING WILDLIFE PRESERVATION IN HONOR OF THE DEATH OF CECIL THE LION YOU STILL CAN FOR THIS WEEK.

2015 CHALLENGE, WEEK 31 OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY – CECIL THE LION

I believe that by now we’ve all heard the story of Cecil the Lion. It’s raised a great deal of debate over Trophy Hunting and Wild Life Preservation. We can’t bring Cecil back, but we can honor him and help protect future generations of wildlife around the globe.

Cecil: How hard is it to hunt a lion?

For this challenge I’m not going to ask you to take a picture of a Lion. You can if you want and happen to have a Lion ready to pose nearby. This Challenge will be about Wildlife Preservation in your area. How it affects you, your community and maybe the entire planet.

School Children Performing

It’s not always about the animals themselves. In many countries, education and efforts to integrate local communities in preservation efforts are often the most rewarding. It’s your assignment to capture the moment in a storytelling image. Tell us how it relates to Wildlife Preservation and how it affects you from an objectif perspective.

 

Gray Lodge Wildlife Area

Preserving Natural Habitat for Wildlife is also important. The Gray Lodge Wildlife Area pictured above is a major migratory stop for birds in California. Without it thousands of birds would not have the strength to complete their yearly migrations.

In this case, Wildlife Preservation in an Urban Nature Park is about caring for injured animals one at a time and releasing them back into nature. Pictured, Wildlife Technician Denis Fournier releases a Snapping Turtle into the wild after it had been treated for a penis prolapse by a local veterinarian.

Remember to accompany your image with a brief paragraph, adding editorial value to your image. Describe to us the Wildlife and Natural Preservation message your image portrays.

Remember to respect nature and not to disturb any animals or destroy their habitat in any way during your quest for the perfect image. Also take time to familiarize yourself with local wildlife and plants. Some animals can present a danger, especially if protecting their young. Spiders and Snakes, especially hard to see baby snakes can present a great danger due to their venom. It’s always better to keep a safe distance from any wild animal no matter how sweet and innocent it may seem. Animals should not be fed. Feeding animals often encourages them to approach humans, increasing the risk of injury from individuals who may appreciate them less than you might. Most animals in rescue centers get there due to an encounter with humans.

Get acquainted with plants like Poison Oak and Poison Ivy or any other dangerous plants in your area. Some plants not only represent a risk of skin irritation but can also kill you if touched or ingested. Learn to identify the dangerous plants in your area.

The sky’s the limit for this week’s challenge. Get out there and show us what Mother Nature has to offer you! Nature and Wildlife photography can be a great family activity

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+, Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

FEATURED IMAGE: Cecil & Jericho Photo: Brent Stapelkamp 500PX

WILDCRU – OXFORD UNIVERSITY : http://wildcru.org/

Facebook Justice for Cecil : https://www.facebook.com/boycottdentistjamespalmer

   

2015 CHALLENGE, WEEK 30 – NUMBERS: SEQUENCE

This week for the Numbers theme your challenge is to shoot a sequence of numbers. Try to find at least three numbers in a sequence.  A sequence is numbers that follow each other in order, not just a group of numbers together.

“untitled” by Yann Duarte

The sequence can be any ordered list of numbers. The example above shows a sequence of odd numbers in reverse. The repetition of the seat and number pattern pulls you into the shoot and gives you the sense that the seats gone on forever.

The example below shows part of grid of sequential numbers.

“Dirty Numbers” by Håkan Dahlström

For this challenge, if you need to create a sequence, go ahead. The example below is actually several shots combined into a sequence (of sorts). The sequence isn’t complete, but there are two sequences of three numbers. Each shot uses the same technique and framing for continuity.

“Numbers” by Matthew Harrigan

As you shoot, consider framing and other elements besides the numbers. You may be able to find a sequence that isn’t necessarily the main subject of the shot. The sequence may be an supporting element in the shot.

“Feet and Numbers” by Mads Bødker

And old camera gear always makes a great shot, especially when it fits the challenge.

“Polaroid miniportrait, M402, M454, M403 Shooting Sequence” by Kanghee Rhee

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

 

2015 CHALLENGE, WEEK 29 OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY – Litter in Nature

We’ve done this before and many challenge members were surprised as to what an eye opener it is to actually look for and find so much trash in our natural spaces.  I for one see a huge difference from the West Coast to the East Coast of the USA and Canada. As much as some countries may look like a dump when it comes to litter in nature, countries like Switzerland make it hard to find litter at all.

Steve Troletti Photography: Montreal -  L’Île-de-la-Visitation Nature Park 2012 &emdash; Trash Littering the banks of Montreal's Île-de-la-Visitation Nature Park

Plastic pollution of our oceans seems to take center stage as the media reports clouds of micro plastic particles in the Pacific Ocean. This plastic pollution comes from somewhere, our own shores. We don’t just pollute the Pacific Ocean, we pollute our rivers and lakes as well. As portrayed by the image above, plastic trash is present under many forms.

Steve Troletti Photography: Litter in Montreal Nature Parks / déchets dans les parcs nature de Montréal &emdash; Déchets - Parc Nature Île-de-la-Visitation Nature Park - Litter

Not all trash pollutes equally. Glass containers are a menace to people as much as they are to our wildlife and our environment. When glass containers find themselves broken they’re an accident waiting to happen.

Steve Troletti Photography: Litter in Montreal Nature Parks / déchets dans les parcs nature de Montréal &emdash; Déchets - Parc Nature Île-de-la-Visitation Nature Park - Litter

This 6 pack holder may seem like harmless pollution. It’s actually a deathtrap for many young animals such as geese, ducks and mammals such as Red Fox kits. The young get these loops around their necks and/or bodies. They usually die of a slow suffocating death as they grow into the plastic ring. Always cut the rings before disposing of similar items.

Steve Troletti Photography: Litter in Montreal Nature Parks / déchets dans les parcs nature de Montréal &emdash; Déchets - Parc Nature Île-de-la-Visitation Nature Park - Litter

We all need personal hygiene items but there’s a time and place for them. Many of these items don’t just litter and pollute our green spaces. Some, such as condoms, also represent a health hazard to people and pets.

Steve Troletti Photography: Litter in Montreal Nature Parks / déchets dans les parcs nature de Montréal &emdash; Déchets - Parc Nature Île-de-la-Visitation Nature Park - Litter

Fast food containers seem to invade natural habitats. They’re all marked with a responsible message inviting users to dispose of them properly. Luckily they’ve evolved from Styrofoam to cardboard minimizing the impact caused by such litter.

Steve Troletti Photography: Montreal -  L’Île-de-la-Visitation Nature Park 2012 &emdash; Trash Littering the banks of Montreal's Île-de-la-Visitation Nature Park

Styrofoam containers are still used for worms and different bait. In fact most of what’s sold for fishing is packed in plastic. Trash from fisherman seem to be scattered along all the rivers I visit in North America

Fishing line may be one the of the most devastating item left by humans along our shores. Animals of all sizes, especially birds suffer greatly. Waterfowl, especially their young get entangled in the line. I’ve even seen a full grown Great Blue Heron entangled in fishing line in a tree. Luckily, wildlife agents were able to rescue it in time. Not an easy task with such a large bird. For those interested I’ve written a small blog on the impact of fishing lines and hooks on Double-crested Cormorants; http://www.trolettiphoto.com/blog/2014/10/Double-crested-Cormorants-and-other-birds-suffer-because-of-our-Trash

Steve Troletti Photography: Litter in Montreal Nature Parks / déchets dans les parcs nature de Montréal &emdash; Welcome to l’Île-de-la-Visitation Nature Park - Bienvenue au parc-nature de l’Île-de-la-Visitation

From night time parties to picnics, hikers to back packers, it seems there’s always a bad apple willing to leave their mark in some of the most beautiful places on earth. When you spend as much time in nature as I do, you just can’t help but notice the negative impact mankind leaves on our planet. These examples barely skim the surface. These images are but a sample of what individuals like you and I can do to our natural spaces with only a handful of trash

For this challenge try and apply all the techniques we’ve practiced over the year to come up with more than a snapshot, create a striking PHOTOGRAPH that sends a message. Although we usually only ask for a photo, I’d like to see a small paragraph that describes the impact and emotion of your photograph, further adding to the editorial value of this assignment.

Remember to respect nature and not to disturb any animals or destroy their habitat in any way during your quest for the perfect image. Also take time to familiarize yourself with local wildlife and plants. Some animals can present a danger, especially if protecting their young. Spiders and Snakes, especially hard to see baby snakes can present a great danger due to their venom. It’s always better to keep a safe distance from any wild animal no matter how sweet and innocent it may seem. Animals should not be fed. Feeding animals often encourages them to approach humans, increasing the risk of injury from individuals who may appreciate them less than you might. Most animals in rescue centers get there due to an encounter with humans.

Get acquainted with plants like Poisson Oak and Poisson Ivy or any other dangerous plants in your area. Some plants not only represent a risk of skin irritation but can also kill you if touched or ingested. Learn to identify the dangerous plants in your area.

The sky’s the limit for this week’s challenge. Get out there and show us what Mother Nature has to offer you! Nature and Wildlife photography can be a great family activity

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.
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2015 CHALLENGE, WEEK 28 ARCHITECTURE – LIGHT SOURCE

This week’s theme will be highly successful for those who take the time to actually read this post. If one simply reads the title, and doesn’t catch my explanation, we’ll see lamps and whatnot.

X-actly

But this week I’d like to look around for light sources that are shaped by the structures around us. The example images will help explain.

Light in the shadowsLight & Shadow [Ming Dynasty Tombs / Beijing]

Light casting a unique shadow, or the negative space where light is and is not pass through a building, wall, or other architectural structure.

Red Sky

Or how a light source interacts with the space it is within. This should end up being a big learning exercise for us all! But after this week, if you work hard to find a really great shot, you may walk away with a greater discerning eye for how light interacts with the objects and structures it is cast upon. And that always makes you a better photographer!

IMGP2496mono

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

American Bald Eagle

2015 CHALLENGE, WEEK 27 OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY – SYMBOLS of NATIONAL PRIDE!

As you all know it’s 4th of July weekend here in the USA. I’ll take advantage of this 4th of July weekend Challenge to wish a Happy Independence Day weekend to all of my fellow Americans.

Steve Troletti Photography: HAWKS and EAGLES / ÉPERVIERS, BUSES ET AIGLES (Accipitridae) &emdash; Bald Eagle / Pygargue à tête blanche

For many Americans, a great symbol of independence Day in America is the Bald Eagle. It’s also a great symbol for our 4th of July weekend Outdoor Photography Challenge.

The American Flag is also a great Symbol of Independence and National pride for Americans. Although it is the 4th of July weekend in America, I want to expand this Challenge to include our members from all around the world and from every Nationality. Many countries celebrate an Independence Day. I want you to get outdoors and photograph a scene, a symbol of your National Pride.

Around the world National Festivities are often celebrated with fireworks. It may seem simple but fireworks demand a special technique. They also look much better when properly composed with their surroundings.

Steve Troletti Photography: VULTURES / VAUTOURS (Cathartidae) &emdash; Andean Condor / Condor des Andes

It’s not all about flamboyant displays of celebration. We all have a natural heritage, a fauna and flora that is not just indigenous, but a representation of the people who inhabit the land. National Animals and flowers are a great way to share with pride, your natural heritage. The above example, the Andean Condor is Colombia’s National Bird.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Mute Swan / Cygne tuberculé

The Mute Swan happen’s to be both Denmark’s and the United Kingdom’s National Bird. Not surprising as it’s truly a majestic bird.

Steve Troletti Photography: MAMMALS / MAMMIFÈRES &emdash; North American Beaver on his Lodge / Castor d'Amérique sur sa hutte

National Animals’s aren’t just limited to birds. Canada has the North American Beaver to be proud of. Although some argue that the Polar Bear should replace the Beaver as a National Animal, the North American Beaver still holds it’s title of Canadian Pride.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Happy Leaf in Snow! / Feuille heureuse dans la neige!

Plants, trees and Flowers also make the list of National Symbols of pride. Canada is very well known for it’s Maple Leaf. Present on the Flag, it’s also at the center of an agricultural economy, the Maple Syrup and its by-products.

To give this Challenge more of an editorial feel please include a short paragraph telling us why you chose your subject. Share with us the National Pride related to your image.

This is a totally OUTDOOR Challenge. It doesn’t have to be 100% nature as man-made objects are permitted.  If you’re looking for a list of National Animals and Plants, just do a search related to your country of choice.

National Animals on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_national_animals

National Flower Emblems on Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floral_emblem

If you’re going to photograph fireworks here are a few tips from Geoff Lawrence: TIPS for photographing Fireworks: http://www.geofflawrence.com/photographing_fireworks.html

 

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 CHALLENGE, WEEK 26 – NUMBERS: ADDRESS

We are back to the “Numbers” theme, and this week we are going to shoot an address.

“117 Fern” by Darwin Bell

For this challenge, try to find an address that is interesting. The numbers should be the most obvious part of the image, but you can include other surrounding details as well.

“Address: YYC 1304” by Grant Hutchinson

Addresses are found everywhere, so you won’t have trouble finding subject matter. Take some time to look around you this week and show us the most interesting address you find.

“Custom Address Sign 252” by Margaret Almon

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

“KK Poon 6” by Jeremy Brooks

 

2015 Challenge, Week 25 – MACRO: METAL

It’s time for more macro fun! This week, we will be shooting macros of something metal.

“water” by Robert Parviainen

Showing metal objects close can reveal interesting details and make them look like something completely different. If you shoot with a large aperture, you can get some great bokeh effects along with the object.

 

“Iridescent” by tanakawho

“Abstract Macro #32” by David Hawkins-Weeks

Ordinary objects can reveal interesting details when a macro lens is used to shoot them. Not everything will become abstract; some things remain very recognizable.

 

“Weakest Link” by Michael Pardo

As a reminder: Macro photography is a type of close-up photography. Generally it means that the image on the sensor is life-size or greater. If you have a macro lens or a camera with a macro setting, you can use that. If you have a mid-range focal length lens, such as a 50mm, you can make a “poor man’s macro” by flipping it around and holding it against the camera body. Focus is achieved by moving the entire assembly close to the subject. If you are using a smartphone, the camera might have a macro focus option, or you can use something like an Olloclip macro lens. If you don’t have any macro lens options, just go for a close up image, and do what you can. Remember, photochallenge is about learning new stuff and having fun!

“Brushed Metal Bracelet” by Albert Lynn

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.