Tag Archives: photography

2016 PhotoChallenge, Week 8: Dominant Depth of Field Blur – Guest Post

This week’s challenge is to create a photo with shallow DOF blur dominating the frame, in both the foreground and the background, with only the most important part of the scene (Your Subject) in sharp focus.

Depth of field

The challenge here is to do this in camera, not in post-processing…do not photoshop blur into your picture!!!

Stand out

Those photographers who have this technique already under control might want to try doing it with a lens much shorter or longer than the one they usually work with.

Magnetic-core Memory

Pay attention to all the elements of your photo, not just the ones in focus, because lines and contrasts can distract from the main subject even when they are blurred. Keep your compositions simple with an interesting subject.

leaf

You probably will have to work closer to your subject than you usually do. Using manual focus makes close work much easier. This site has a calculator which will help you determine how far your subject must be from your lens to be sharp: http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/dof-calculator.htm.

 

Challenge by Michelle Maani: I started my photography journey in 2006 when I bought my first digital camera, a pocket point and shoot that I bought to record a trip to Europe that summer. I was very disappointed with my shots! I’ve gradually worked my way up through better cameras and learning how to use them. At some point I became enamored with bird photography, and that has been my primary focus for several years.  Now that I have retired I am taking classes and learning what I can do with my camera and about other forms of photography, and I feel like a whole new world has opened. I live in the “other Vancouver”, in Washington state in the US.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 PhotoChallenge is fun and easy.

 

 

DSC_8733-HDR-Edit-under-papineau-bridge-sm2

2016 PHOTOCHALLENGE WEEK 2: VIEW FROM UNDER THE BRIDGE – HDR

First and foremost, I want to wish you all a Wonderful New Year and a BIG THANK YOU for being part of the 2016 PhotoChallenge.

Here it is, my first PhotoChallenge of the year. Keeping up with my traditional Outdoor Photography themes, I’ll be bringing a multitude of different techniques to apply in both urban and natural settings. As you all know by now, every 4th 2016 PhotoChallenge will be a guest post from one of you. You’re all welcome to volunteer and contact me with your contribution to become one of our next Guest Challengers.

Snowy Winter Scenes are a real challenge on this El Niño year. Suisse Romande, the western French speaking part of Switzerland has yet to accumulate any snow in the lower elevations. Montreal, Canada had no snow for Christmas and this weekend the temps are above freezing. Winter snow storms are translating into torrential downpours.  Southern California has been anything but sunny.

For this second PhotoChallenge of the year, I decided to get us to photograph a point of view from under a bridge. One, it will keep the rain off our heads. Second, it’s challenging from a composition point of view. The true challenge remains lighting. It’s generally darker under the bridge than it is out in the open. Since I want you to include parts of the bridge’s understructure, I’m making this an HDR PhotoChallenge.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash;

I chose to photograph my PhotoChallenge image above with a full-frame fisheye lens. Your perspective will vary greatly depending on the focal length of the lens you choose. I added an extra ounce of challenge by including the bright soon to set Sun piercing through the clouds in my image.  I also applied a little defishing to the final image to give it a more linear feel.

challenge-hdr-sample-steve-troletti

As illustrated by my RAW Image Thumbnails above, I initially shot 10 images each at 1.5 stops interval. This allows me to get some detail in the bright sunlit areas to the poorly lit underparts of the bridge. In post processing I selected only 5 of the 10 images, those I felt gave me the range I needed to get the most out of every area of my composition. To keep things simple I used LightRoom’s HDR merge and completed to final image adjustments in Photoshop. Third Party dedicated HDR software will give you a much higher image quality. On the flip side, you can use the built in HDR features of your camera or smartphone as in the image below.

DSC_8733-HDR-Edit-under-papineau-bridge-sm2

To complete this challenge I highly suggest you use a tripod. Even when using the built in HDR camera functions, stability is your best friend. Your image will need to illustrate a landscape/cityscape style view from under a bridge. It must also include elements of the underparts of a bridge’s structure. Depending on your focal length you may end up slightly next to the bridge. Please be careful not to put yourself in arms way of falling objects. Remember snow plows also clear bridges projecting snow to either side.

I want to stress that for the 2016 PhotoChallenge, we’re emphasizing taking your time to properly compose and capture your scene. This is meant to be photography, not a snapshot session. The final result should be a well composed image with well balanced light that is pleasing to the eye. Don’t be afraid to experiment with manual settings, different apertures and shutter speeds. In the right circumstances, long exposures can add a dramatic effect.

Here are some inspiring examples found on Flickr

HDR Photo of a Lifeguard Tower on Singer Island

Elisabeth Bridge

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org and #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2016 PhotoChallenge Week 1: B&W – MINIMALISM

Welcome to the the 2016 PhotoChallenge! Like last year, Trevor, Steve, and I will each stick to a theme throughout the year. My theme for the year goes back to the roots of photography: black and white. The subject matter will change and will vary widely, but will be designed to emphasize aspects of black and white photography.

I took a photography class many, many years ago in high school and fell in love with black and white. That was before digital photography, so I spent a lot of hours in the dark room, and seeing my images appear on paper hooked me. Now my daughter is taking photography in high school and got a Pentax K-1000 film camera for Christmas. I guess she was the inspiration for my 2016 theme. Seeing her film photos brought me back to the darkroom. I plan on going back to my roots this year and building a dark room out in the garage, so might even use film for some of the challenges.

We’ll get 2016 started with MINIMALISM. For minimalism you want to keep the shot as simple as possible. Minimalism in photography follows the same general principles of minimalist art by focusing on color, lines, shapes, and geometry to convey meaning. Since this is a black and white challenge, color won’t be something you can use. Your goal is to reduce the number of elements and keep the photo as simple as possible while focusing on the composition.
on the deck

Minimalism in photography often means isolating a subject from the surroundings, or picking subjects is stark or simple environments. In the example above, the photographer isolated a single leaf, but there were likely many more leaves on the deck. Isolation can be a key to minimalism, but this shot also employs strong compositional elements and contrast to convey a since of isolation. The deck lines divide the frame into three parts (rule of odds) and the placement of the leaf follows the rule of thirds.

All You Need is Money and Nerves of Steel

Lines and contrast are often used in minimalist photography. Lines lead your eye through a frame while contrast can be used to strengthen those lines. The shot above uses leading lines to convey a sense of the infinite. The shot below also uses lines and contrast, but conveys an entirely different feeling.

There's Love If You Want It

Minimalism often focuses on shapes, and shadows emphasize shapes. The shot below uses the repetitive shadows of a fence, but disrupts that repetition with a solitary bird.
rail fence
Minimalism, like all photography and art, means something different to each person. You can choose to find a subject, like the leaf, or focus on lines and shapes.

An open door

For me, minimalism is about removing distractions and focusing on one thing. With minimalism less is more – the simpler, the better. Keep your eye out for shapes and strong lines, then frame the shot to emphasize a single element.

If you need more inspiration for minimalism, here are a few links:

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org and #photochallenge2016.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2016 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

p1037057539-5

2015 CHALLENGE, WEEK 47: LONG EXPOSURE NIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

Just had a photographer friend of mine, Eric Constantineau, give a conference at the Montreal Camera Club. It was on Night Photography and Long Exposures. I guess you can all figure out where the inspiration for this week’s Challenge came from.

For this week’s challenge, we’re combining both the night aspect and the long exposures. The reduced light from dusk on makes it easier to get nice long exposures. Anything from stars to automobile lights come to life. A tripod will be necessary to stabilize your camera. A polarized filter or/and a light ND filter wlil help depending on the light conditions.

Steve Troletti Photography: Winter Festivals / Festivals d'hiver &emdash; Ferris Wheel / La Grande Roue

My personal favorite, Ferris Wheels in motion at night. You’ll have to shoot in manual mode. I like to work with 30 second exposures as it gives plenty of time to get plenty of action in front of the lens. I always shoot at my camera’s native ISO to reduce noise in long exposures. Pay attention not to over expose lights as you will loose details in those areas. In this case the long exposure also minimized the appearance of individuals walking by.

Steve Troletti Photography: PICTURE OF THE DAY / PHOTO DU JOUR &emdash; Lactantia at night

For the sake of clarity and sharpness, I never recommend completely stepping down your lens. However the more you do the more you will get a star-shape effect from fixed lighting. At first glance this image may not seem like a very long exposure. It’s a 2 minute long exposure. We can see a stream of car lights above the water line. The real catch, thousands of Snow Geese are swimming along in front of me in the water. Except for a white smudgy texture they’re completely gone due to the long exposure time.

Berlin Night

The hustle and bustle of city life offers constant movement by night. From the rotating advertisement cylinder, to the bus light trails and the movement of the clouds, this image has multiple aspects of captured motion.

 

Surprise! Another Fireworks Shot!   Fireworks themselves are captured with long exposures. Although a relatively short, long exposure, will give you amazing results, a much longer controlled exposure allows you to capture multiple facets of a fireworks presentation onto one image. Keep your shutter open in BULB mode. Cover your lens with a black hat or other object. I use a cut down neoprene bottle cooler. Uncover the lens for just the parts you want exposed and cover it up again when you don’t want your scene exposed.     Light Painting 008   Naturally night time long exposures wouldn’t be complete without Light Painting. I would recommend flashlights over the above technique of twirling burning steel wool. If you choose to do so, please read up on all the safety concerns and don’t leave home without a fire extinguisher. Use all the protective gear you may need as this stuff burns clothing, skin, hair and eyes. If you’ve never done this before, I suggest you attend a workshop first. As you can see the possibilities are truly limitless. With the days getting shorter in the Northern Hemisphere and not too long in the Southern Hemisphere, this is the perfect time of year to practice your night photography.  

This will be more of an interpretive challenge leaving the door wide open to your imagination. To complete your challenge your image will have to have been taken at night and demonstrate an effect such as movement from the long exposure.

 

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 CHALLENGE WEEK 40: ROOM WITH A VIEW – HDR

Filling in for Trevor I’ll focus on his Architectural theme for the PhotoChallenge. This week I was thinking of a little technique that is often used for real estate photography and portraying rooms in a catalog.

Kabania – Cabanitas – Totoche – Interieur / Inside – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

HDR is often used to portray the inside of a room with the outdoor view from the windows on one well exposed image. A minimum of two images is necessary, although three works better. One with the room well exposed and one with the windows well exposed. Once blended in HDR, you will have a well balanced image of the interior and the exterior view. The above HDR image is in a 360 degree photosphere which is great for online virtual tours. Good Morning

If you don’t use HDR with at least two images and rely on your camera’s automatic settings, you’ll have an image resembling the one above. The result, blown out details in the window and most probably an underexposed interior.

Room View, Hollywood Beach Marriot

Nothing can be more inviting than being able to show an ocean view from inside the room. In this case the view sells the room.

Living Room View

Same goes for this living room view above. The view is as much part of the decor as the leather couch and the wood log interior. The final image was created from 11 images incrementally exposed. To make the look real, we usually use what is referred to as a PHOTO REALISTIC HDR rendition. HDR often results in a cartoonish look. That’s not what we’re looking for. We want it to look as natural as possible. You’ll have to pay attention to color saturation and hue when blending your images.

To complete this challenge you will have to:

  • Capture at least two images with different exposures to create one well balanced image of an interior with it’s view clearly visible. The image can be a standard flat two dimensional image or a 360 degree photosphere. (Refer to our photosphere challenge)
  • Blend the two or more exposures to create one image that has a photo realistic look.

Your image has to document the room as well as the view. Make sure the room elements such as decor and walls are present in your image. We want more than just a window frame with a view. We want to feel the hidden charms behind the room in question.

Both Lightroom and Photoshop now include HDR functions. HDR blending options are now available in most photo editing software including mobile phone apps. They are often now part of your camera settings and can be programmed and blended in your camera or phone. Therefore the tools to complete this challenge are now readily available for mainstream photography as well as mobile phone photographers.

Your best friend in this case will be a tripod to stabilize your camera or phone. Each image as to match exactly in order to be well blended to one HDR image.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three)
  • Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video. Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.
Apionid CC license

2015 CHALLENGE WEEK 39: PANNING

Since the November 25, 2015 Challenge will involve a great deal of work, I decided to be nice and base this week’s Challenge on an easy but seldom practiced technique called PANNING. Believe it or not, it has nothing to do with the above cover image by Apionid  😉

panning jeep

Panning usually involves moving your camera along an horizontal axis while following a moving subject. It can be anything in movement such as a bird in flight, cyclist or a jeep as in the above image. A slower shutter  speed is used to accentuate the movement in the background while following the subject to keep it relatively sharp.   Red Fox Chasing Squirrel by Steve Troletti If you have multiple subjects moving at different speeds then you will only have one subject showing up clearly on your image. In the above image the Squirrel is moving faster than the Red Fox. I was panning and focused on the Fox’s head in addition to the reduced depth of field of my Telephoto Lens.   kick scooter panning, bilbao

A slower moving subject will be easier to manage as it will more easily remain in sharper focus. Although I’ve done panning at Formula One Races with fast moving cars, I always practiced ahead of time with Cyclists using the track outside event schedules. In this case the B&W look adds to the overall artistic feeling of the image.

Guglielmo in altalena

A few tips you may find useful:

  • Shoot handheld for freedom of movement. A monopod to remove vertical movement may be useful but not a Tripod unless the scene is really rehearsed.
  • If your subject is close enough you can use a Flash to help make your subject sharper. The strobe will freeze motion at 1/1000th of a second or faster.
  • Use a 50mm Full Frame equivalent or wider to maintain stability and depth of field. The wider the lens the easier to control.
  • Experiment with different shutter speeds (I.E. 1/15, 1/30, 1/60…) depending on your subject’s speed and ambient light.
  • Keep your camera in continuous focus mode in order to better track your subject.
  • A smaller apperture to increase depth of field will help keep the subject in focus as well.
  • ALWAYS REMAIN AWARE OF YOUR ENVIRONMENT. YOU DON’T WANT TO GET HIT BY YOUR SUBJECT OR ANY OTHER MOVING OBJECT.

HEADS UP:

As I previously mentioned my next challenge is a Spooky Infrared Challenge for the entire week preceding Halloween. An Infrared filter will be necessary. You don’t need a modified camera but keep in mind that all camera/lens combinations will give different results. Image quality won’t be the primary factor so you can procure yourself a lesser quality filter for the challenge. It should be a 720nm Infrared Filter similar to the HOYA R72. You can even make your own as in this DIY Project https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CveDYDieaFg

 

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

 

2015 Challenge, WEEK 20: ARCHITECTURE – Stairwell 

Embarcadero Stairwell

Embarcadero Stairwell by John Wright

Stairwells were once an important part of the architect’s work. They used their artistry to display more beauty in their work. Today a stairwell isn’t designed, other than for structural integrity. They’re coded into simplicity, and often just tucked away for escape.

Kroeber Stairwell From Above We All Fall in Love Sometimes

I’d love it if you visit a local older building like a courthouse or city government building. Maybe an older church. This is to push you from settling.

Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin (Stairwell) Render of Our Stairwell Looking Up

Many stairwells are boring. If that’s all you have access to, don’t fret. Use some of the techniques you’ve learned in some of the other challenges to create something beautiful. The example photos I’m posting are a diverse set of stairwells.

Handley Library Stairwell

Indoors our outdoors, you’ll find great examples. Just don’t settle scout about some, to be sure you’re going to submit the best shot you can create.

Beckwith Commercial Block (1882) - interior detail

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original photograph (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • The posted image should be a photograph, not a video.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.
Great Blue Heron landing

2015 Challenge, Week 15 : OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY – MIGRATING BIRDS

The Spring bird migration is finally in full swing and will hit the Northern States and Canada this weekend. While the Northern Hemisphere is in Spring Migration, Fall migration is taking place in the Southern Hemisphere. This week we’ll focus on the newly arriving species for each of our very own localities.

For those of you who are new to this, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology has you covered in the USA with their migration forecasts : http://birdcast.info/forecast/regional-migration-forecast-10-17-april/ I’m sure similar information is available on the web for just about every region in the world

Large birds of prey to the minuscule hummingbirds are in route to their summer nesting grounds. Some have a yearly migration route as far as Argentina to Northern Canada and back. In the Greater Montreal Area Owls, Red Polls, Juncos, etc… head north in Spring to make room for their Southern Cousin’s arrival.

Red-winged blackbird - First migrant

Red-winged blackbird – First migrant

One of our early migrants is the Red-winged blackbird. They huddle by the bird-feeders hoping for a warmer day. They usually get caught in unpredictable weather from late winter storms to extremely cold nights.

Black duck fending off Mallard Duck

Black duck fending off Mallard Duck

The most common ducks are quick to follow. With Spring fever in the air territorial conflicts are quick to come about.

Canada Goose Feeding

Canada Goose Feeding

Geese aren’t far behind. These large water fowls not only look for water but feed on grass and the remains of last year’s crops until a new vegetation starts to flourish.

Great Blue Heron landing

Great Blue Heron landing

As soon as a creek melts open the Great Blue Heron makes its presence known. One of the last herons to leave in December, it promptly makes its way back in early Spring.

Black-crowned night heron

Black-crowned night heron

I was however very surprised to find this Black-crowned night heron perched in a tree so early on in the season.

Great egret

Great egret

Even more surprising was this Great egret. All of these herons have an inherent fear of man. Your presence may spook them, so be careful. If they fly away, just settle in and be patient. If there’s food they will be back. Just avoid loud noises and jerky movement.

Mating Lori parakeets

Mating Lori parakeets

Some birds are already mating and nest building. It’s important to keep a respectable distance to totally minimize our impact on these birds. We don’t want to stress them to the point where they leave their nesting grounds, especially if eggs are already in the nest.

Please show the up-most in respect for our feathered friends. We want to capture a natural looking image of a relaxed bird. A stressed animal will show in your images and lower the appeal all together. Take time to observe the birds and get familiar with them. Birds are curious in nature and if you’re patient, still and quiet, you’ll be rewarded.

This Photo Challenge is entirely about having FUN OUTDOORS! PLEASE KEEP MAN MADE ITEMS OUT of your image as this theme is entirely NATURE based.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.

2015 Challenge, Week 12 : ARCHITECTURE – WINDOWS LOOKING OUT

We sometimes think of Architectural photography as looking at a building from the outside. A great deal of Architectural engineering and design is often invested in giving a look from the inside to the outside. Windows and glass paneling connects us with the outside world, illuminating the indoors and often enhancing its appearance

Coit Tower City View

Not all windows have glass panes. Many older structures in Europe and the Middle-East have but openings carved out of the structure and protected by shutters when necessary. I find it connects us better with the world outside our four walls.

NYC Window View (a la Edward Hopper)

Not all windows give us the dream view we’re all contemplating. For some it’s but the hustle and bustle of urban life. This New York City hotel Room view is the perfect example.

Pier Window

Even this abandoned building on the peer has a dream view through it’s industrial windows that is the envy of many Malibu homes.

I'm a young one stuck in the thoughts of an old one's head. (205)

You can add portraiture to your architectural image thus enhancing the sense of being and of welfare.

Breakfast with a View
At times Photo-Realistic HDR techniques of two or more images are needed to fully capture the ambiance of a room. The brightly lit outdoor scene needs to be balanced with the poorly lit view of the room.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.
HAKA

2015 Challenge, Week 11 : OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY – HAKA

This week I decided to change things around a bit. I still want to get you outdoors since this is outdoor photography. I’m bringing back a theme from 2013, the HAKA, also known as the Maori war dance. Rooted in ancient polynesian culture, the HAKA has been brought back to life with the ALL BLACKS, New Zealand’s national Rugby Team.

Wikipedia describes the HAKA as; The Haka (plural is the same as singular: haka) is a traditional ancestral war cry, dance or challenge from the Māori people of New Zealand. It is a posture dance performed by a group, with vigorous movements and stamping of the feet with rhythmically shouted accompaniment.

HAKA positions

For those of you into Rugby, the All Blacks Rugby team performs a ritual HAKA prior to every game. The first step will be to familiarize yourself with the various positions of the HAKA. Although the WHAKA is the most commonly used position, have fun experimenting. The more participants you get in your photo the better it will be!

Backlit HAKA

Since this is an OUTDOOR PHOTOGRAPHY CHALLENGE, the setting is as important as the models performing the HAKA. Take care in finding the perfect outdoor spot for your HAKA. Don’t be afraid to experiment with different lighting. Backlit subjects and silhouettes will add a creative touch to your HAKA as well as give anonymity to a shy participant.

HAY HAKA

Just because you’re the photographer doesn’t mean you can’t participate. Don’t forget your tripod, set your camera timer and join your HAKA.

Steve and Francois HAKA

Not all HAKA pictures have to be planned ahead and organized. Some can be spontaneous and just as much fun to make.

HAKA Princess

This Photo Challenge is entirely about having FUN OUTDOORS! Get creative and have fun with family and friends creating the best HAKA ever.

The rules are pretty simple:

  • Post one original (Your Image) shot each week per theme posted on this blog to Google+Facebook, or Flickr (or all three). Tag the photo #photochallenge.org or #photochallenge2015.
  • The shot should be a new shot you took for the current weekly theme, not something from your back catalog or someone else’s image.
  • Don’t leave home without your camera. Participating in the 2015 Photo Challenge is fun and easy.